Viewing blog posts categorized under "Eating Disorder Treatment"

Why Animal Therapy?

posted by Julie O'Toole on May 25, 2017 at 9:35am

8 AM: drop-off time at Kartini Clinic. It’s early, and patients and parents alike have a day of hard work ahead of them. But then... enter Ryla.

Family therapist Lisa Peacock says that one of her favorite moments of the day is seeing the mood in the waiting room transform when Ryla or Baxter, her two therapy dogs, run in to say good morning. That’s one of the simplest but most effective aspects of animal therapy: most people like animals, and having one around makes them happier.

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Processed Food the Foodie Way

posted by gwen@parachutestrategies.com on April 13, 2017 at 9:29am

Nearly every day I am anxiously asked whether or not our young patients can have rice “milk,” almond “milk,” soy “milk” or coconut “milk” instead of the whole milk that is on our menu. These inaptly named “milks” are about as related to milk as cheese whiz is to cheese, and although not harmful (and even delicious), should not be mistaken for the white beverage given to early mankind by dairy animals as a source of protein, fat, calcium and vitamins. They are perhaps more properly…

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Five Things Every Parent Should Know About Childhood Eating Disorders

posted by Julie O'Toole on February 28, 2017 at 3:00pm

1) Weight loss in children isn’t normal

Imagine you’re a parent of a bright, active 12 year old boy. He gets good grades and has lots of friends. He excels at sports. Then something changes; he begins to lose weight. At his last checkup his pediatrician registers a heart rate in the low 50s. He starts to withdraw, not doing many things he used to enjoy, with the exception of exercise. He now exercises with a new intensity.

His doctor tells you not to worry. “It’s just a stage”, she…

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Why We Limit Hyper-Palatable Foods for One Year

posted by Julie O'Toole on September 22, 2016 at 9:50am

When I was first introduced to the Minnesota Semi-Starvation Study (MSSS), published in 1950 by Ancel Keys and his team, I was overwhelmed by the sheer volume of data they were able to accumulate about the physical and psychological ramifications of semi-starvation in humans.

It was mind-blowing. Then I came across the graph on page 106 of the hardbound edition called “Over-all Changes in Body Weight in the Minnesota Experiment” with the subtitle: “Expressed as a percentage of the…

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Whole Milk and Kartini’s Meal Plan

posted by Julie O'Toole on November 18, 2015 at 3:49pm

I can’t tell you how often a look of horror and surprise crosses parents’ faces when I explain to them that Kartini Clinic’s Meal Plan, in our spirit of real, undoctored (no pun intended) food, uses only full fat dairy products: whole milk, whole milk yogurt, whole milk cottage cheese, etc. “But doctor,” more than one father has said, “I have high cholesterol!”  

“How high?”, I ask. Usually they don’t know, but sometimes say that their doctor told them their cholesterol was “kind of…

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Wishing Tom Insel Well

posted by Julie O'Toole on September 16, 2015 at 4:35pm

This morning it was announced that Dr. Tom Insel, executive director of the National Institutes of Mental Health (NIMH) since 2002, will be leaving that august institution to join Google (aka Alphabet) in their quest to change the world of health. We have followed Dr. Insel’s blogs and presentations closely for many years on our own Kartini newsletter.

Now that he's leaving I say more power to him (after a moment of panic at the prospect of losing his strong and biology-focused…

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Connecting the Dots

posted by Julie O'Toole on February 6, 2015 at 4:33pm

Two current Kartini parents handed me an excellent article the other day whose lead author, Walter Kaye, is likely well known to our readers.  The article, Temperament-based Treatment for Anorexia Nervosa, appeared in the European Eating Disorders Review.

I was especially pleased to see this article, although many of us have heard Walt speak about meal planning and the latest neuro-biological and neuro-radiological evidence before.  Neuro-biological and neuro-psychological evidence…

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The Surprising Similarities Between Anorexia and Obesity

posted by Julie O'Toole on January 28, 2015 at 10:14am

One thing I've observed over the years is that those readers who are interested in anorexia nervosa seem to have little interest in obesity, which they often seem regard as an lifestyle choice irrelevant to them, while those who study obesity often ask themselves what this rare condition (AN) has to do with their vastly more prevalent (read: important) condition of obesity (OB)? Quite a lot, as it turns out. And by the way, it’s worth repeating at the outset, neither condition is one…

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The Dangers of Staying Slightly Below Weight

posted by Julie O'Toole on December 10, 2014 at 8:35am
I am a pediatric eating disorder doctor and try my best to limit my practice to patients 22 and younger. Why is this hard? Because I have a great treatment team and good treatment is hard to come by, so we sometimes run into deserving and desperate adult patients, whom we simply must refer to adult providers. I say this so that readers of this blog may put my recommendations into the context of the age group with which I am most familiar, although it is my opinion that this topic is… Read More

Taking A Moment To Vent

posted by Julie O'Toole on November 19, 2014 at 9:27am
My good friend and colleague Therese Waterhous, a PhD, RD eating disorder specialist and board member of the parent organization F.E.A.S.T., called me the other day.  She needed to vent, and now, apparently, I do too. It’s not that her annoying experience was rare or new, it’s just the fact that such ignorance persists and that at this point -- given the avalanche of new information about pediatric eating disorders --  such ignorance seems willful. You can update your database.… Read More
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