Viewing blog posts tagged with "Eating Disorders"

Who You Callin’ Fat?

posted by Julie O'Toole on July 3, 2013 at 10:50pm

Patient:  I have battled with my weight all my life, doctor.  It's my major health issue.

Doctor:  What does that mean, Susan?

Patient:  (irritated) It means, doctor, that I have been fat since I was a kid.

Doctor:  I see.  Are other family members overweight too?

Patient:  The word is fat.  F.A.T.  Let's call it what it is.  And no, they aren't.  I was adopted.

Doctor:  In that case, Susan, it seems reasonable to assume that your weight problem is not a result of anything you…

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Diet and exercise: the obsessions that will not die

posted by Julie O'Toole on June 27, 2013 at 6:27am

Aaargh! 

Although dieting has been shown repeatedly to be destructive, counter-productive and useless in most settings (i.e. you re-gain everything you lose and then some…), it simply will not die as a panacea for improving health.  The belief in weight loss/dieting and exercise as a health tool is so entrenched that people, even highly educated people, continue to insist that the emperor does have clothes, despite all evidence to the contrary.

I was happily reading over-due emails…

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Gene Mutations and the Weight Problems That Plague Us

posted by Julie O'Toole on May 30, 2013 at 2:10am

You’ve heard it everywhere: your friends, your doctor, the New York Times, your personal trainer, virtually anyone who talks to you about health for more than five minutes will give you the same litany:  we need to lose weight to be healthy and all we need to do to achieve that loss is to change what we eat (fewer refined high glycemic index carbs, leaner meats, more fish, better quality fats, etc.) and, ultimately, how much of it we eat -- otherwise we will not only get fat and look…

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Cook, My Darling Daughter!

posted by Julie O'Toole on April 19, 2013 at 9:14am

Cook, My Darling Daughter! is the title of a cookbook from the 1950’s I found in a secondhand bookstore and gave my eldest daughter as a young adult.  She had little experience of cooking, since in our family parents cook for their kids, and even though her brother and at least one of her younger sisters were determined foodies and excellent cooks, she had never been interested.  She was content to be fed, and since this was consistent with the culture of our family, her disinterest…

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Selective Eating in Children

posted by Julie O'Toole on March 15, 2013 at 2:48am

[Ed. Note: a more recent blog on this subject can be found here).

There is a little talked-about pediatric eating disorder that I have not covered extensively in my blogs, nor is it covered well in most discussions elsewhere, including the various iterations of the DSM.  As a general pediatrician, like all other pediatricians, I ran into it, but it wasn’t until I read Dr. Rachel Bryant-Waugh and Dr. Bryan Lask’s  Eating Disorders: A Parents' Guide  years ago, that I was introduced…

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License to eat: obesity and longevity

posted by Julie O'Toole on February 22, 2013 at 12:23am

According to Wikipedia Medscape is: a web resource for physicians and other health professionals. It features peer-reviewed original medical journal articles, CME (Continuing Medical Education), a customized version of the National Library of Medicine's MEDLINE database, daily medical news, major conference coverage, and drug information—including a drug database (Medscape Drug Reference, or MDR) and drug interaction checker. All content in Medscape is available free of charge for…

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Physiology of Binge Eating and What Motivates Us

posted by Julie O'Toole on January 26, 2013 at 2:26am

On the recommendation of Dr. Rod McClymont, of the Center for Eating and Dieting Disorders, Bathurst, Australia, I have been reading a new book, Animal Models of Eating Disorders (Humana Press 2013) edited by Nicole Avena.  The second chapter, by Mary M Boggiano Ph.D., stopped me in my tracks:  “Binge-Prone Versus Binge-Resistant Rats”.

Don’t laugh.  We are mammals; they are mammals.  We study rats to understand the physiology of cancer.  We study rats to understand the physiology of…

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weight gain and percentiles after weight restoration

posted by Julie O'Toole on December 21, 2012 at 9:56pm

I was recently asked an important question which I was unable to address during my breakout workshop at this year's FEAST Symposium 2012.

The question: does a child who has completed their height growth need to continue to gain weight in order to stay on the same growth percentile “line” until they are 20 years old?

A glance at an average growth chart for girls shows a flattening out of the height curves somewhere around age 15.  This is because the average Caucasian girl achieves…

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Congressional Presentation, November 29, 2012

posted by Julie O'Toole on December 8, 2012 at 2:01am

On Thursday November 29th I went with Laura Collins and the FEAST team to give "testimony" to congressional staffers about the plight of children with anorexia nervosa.  It was an impressive experience to enter the Dirksen building where  many of the senators (including our own Ron Wyden) have their offices.  Senator Schumer (NY) walked past us; the walls and floors were stone and marble and dark wood, the ceilings twenty feet high, the plaster frieze was carved with symbols of the…

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An early warning system for eating disorders

posted by Julie O'Toole on November 2, 2012 at 2:00pm

What would we do without our modern early warning systems?  The terrible weather ravaging New York, New Jersey and all along the East Coast this week has made me reflect a lot on this.  Not only do we at Kartini have treasured colleagues in those places but we also have many patients and former patients there, including one beloved patient currently in a New Jersey hospital.  Our thoughts have been continually with them these past few days.

As terrible as this storm has been, however,…

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