Viewing blog posts tagged with "Weight Gain"

Hard News About Exercise And Recovery

posted by Julie O'Toole on June 5, 2014 at 12:37am

I was recently sent an article from which I will be quoting extensively here (it’s also included in this newsletter - ed.). The article is by Heidi Mills, writing for Outside magazine and features the work of Dr. Emily Cooper of Seattle Performance Medicine. Dr. Cooper has consulted with Kartini Clinic on metabolic health and weight balancing for some time.  Originally, we worked together to try and solve the conundrum of patients with AN who appear to be weight restored but who…

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Thinking About Obesity

posted by Julie O'Toole on February 26, 2014 at 6:40pm

Thinking about obesity: calmly, rationally and outside the box

When I was a rotating intern at Sacred Heart Medical Center, long ago, I attended rounds with the then head of medicine Dr. Patrick Tennison. Dr. Tennison was a thin, dark haired, intense guy who years later would save my life, but at that time was obsessed with imbuing young doctors with a sense of urgency about diagnostic dilemmas. He was more like a highly competitive detective than your typical doctor.  

“The main…

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Weight Restoration 2.0

posted by Julie O'Toole on February 20, 2014 at 2:59am

At Kartini Clinic we have been embarking on something we call “weight restoration 2.0”.  In other words we are trying to move beyond mere weight restoration (as critical as that is) towards a deeper assessment of each patient’s full physical recovery.  We have noticed, over the years of faithfully weight restoring each and every patient, that people respond differently to recovery from starvation, depending no doubt on their genetics and on the duration of their illness. Just one…

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Why the basic sciences may save us all

posted by Julie O'Toole on February 13, 2014 at 12:10am

In previous blogs I have spoken to the importance of bench science -- the kind done in the lab to decode the “basic” science that underlies human physiology -- to us as clinicians and to us as patients. And the branch of the sciences which explores the connection between bench science or lab science and clinical medicine, including mental health, is called translational medicine.

This last night I couldn’t sleep. This happens to me when I have any viral illness and I have learned to…

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Vegetables and Kartini’s Meal Plan

posted by Julie O'Toole on January 22, 2014 at 11:33pm

Despite the fact that we occasionally receive criticism of our Meal Plan for its supposed “rigidity”, what has struck me after years of reading people’s food journals is the degree to which people self-limit their food choices.  This is especially true of vegetables.  I have also noticed that our families’ food journals fall roughly into two categories: those who seem to relish a more Mediterranean style of eating (the original intent of the Meal Plan, by the way) and those who eat a…

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Appeasing The Monster

posted by Julie O'Toole on December 18, 2013 at 11:55pm

Some blog topics draw in a continuous trickle of commentary long after they've been published.  One such blog is entitled “Determining Ideal Body Weight”. And little wonder.

 

The other day I answered a comment by a young reader named Charlotte. It started me thinking how urgent her question might be for others who may not have read the original blog (or at least not for some time).  Charlotte wrote:

"I am an 18 year old female with a history of initially EDNOS and then AN B/P…

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Eating for Life

posted by Julie O'Toole on November 27, 2013 at 11:59pm

A recent book by UCSF professor and pediatric endocrinologist Dr. Robert Lustig -- horridly titled Fat Chance -- has turned my mind to past discussions of our program’s dietary recommendations, aka the Kartini Meal Plan.

In its primary and original form the Kartini Meal Plan was developed to refeed children with restrictive eating disorders and weight loss following principles I have spoken about before: real food, cooked at home, eaten together in a spirit of joy.  Kartini’s Meal…

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The Very Young Child With Anorexia

posted by Julie O'Toole on October 31, 2013 at 12:18am

Many people are shocked when they learn that we have patients with anorexia nervosa as young as six or seven, and, although it is rare, it certainly does occur.

Why are they shocked?  Because most of these folks, despite hearing me (and Dr. Tom Insel, among others) say “it’s a brain disorder”, still deeply believe that “the media” and our obsession with thinness causes anorexia.  They are horrified that someone so young could be “ruined by society”.  And blaming the parents for this…

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The Kartini Meal Plan De-Mystified

posted by Julie O'Toole on October 17, 2013 at 12:17am

There is a common misconception out there that Kartini patients are fed on a strict meal plan for the rest of their lives.  But what exactly is our meal plan? And while we talking about it, what's our approach to meals and food in general?

Well…

  1. there’s the “parents in charge” (of all meals) thing

  2. there’s the recording on the food journal thing

  3. there’s the family dinners thing/ home cooking thing

  4. there’s the whole-milk-no-low-fat thing

  5. there’s the…

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DNA Detective

posted by Julie O'Toole on September 12, 2013 at 1:18am

I read an article about an artist/scientist who creates models of perfect strangers from bits of their DNA extracted from hair and bodily detritus left behind, inadvertently, by all of us every day.  Her name is Heather.  An innocuous enough sounding name, right?

Watch this video and you are guaranteed to have your mind blown.  And by blown, I mean blown apart, because so many different issues are raised in such a short video that it’s hard to even list them all.   And what strikes…

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